Brexit, British Government, Brussels, GDPR, Labour Law, Michel Barnier, Theresa May

The @GovUk #Brexit White Paper: More Questions than Answers

This blogpost was written on Friday, July 13th, 2018 

WHIf it worked once it will work again. That seems to be Theresa May’s approach to the Brexit negotiations, judging by the White Paper The Future Relationship Between The UK And The EU, published on Thursday. Back in 2012 when she was Home Secretary, using protocol 36 of the Lisbon Treaty, May opted-out en bloc from all the police and criminal justice measures adopted under the Maastricht Treaty before the EU court of justice in Luxembourg took over jurisdiction of them under Lisbon.

She then proceeded to opt back in to all of the measures she liked but was able to claim, to assuage die-hard anti-European Court Tory backbenchers, that she had opted-out.

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Brexit, Data Protection, Data transfers, GDPR, Michel Barnier

BEERG #Brexit Blog: A Data Special:- @MichelBarnier highlights #data as a critical issue

This BEERG Brexit Blog is a special issue looking at critical data issues that have been recently highlighted, but which were also forecast here many months ago:

BarnierSpeaking at the 28th Congress of the International Federation for European Law (FIDE) in Lisbon last weekend, the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier devoted a considerable section of his Lisbon speech to the impact of Brexit on data transfers between the EU and UK post Brexit, saying: “the UK must understand that the only possibility for the EU to protect personal data is through an adequacy decision”.

Here is that portion of M. Barnier’s speech – the BEERG analysis appears after it.

“The United Kingdom wants to leave. That is its decision. Not ours. And that has consequences. Allow me to give an example. The General Data Protection Regulation – GDPR – came into force yesterday. According to the United Kingdom’s position first presented – and published – this week on data protection:

The United Kingdom would like its supervisor to remain on the European Data Protection Board, created by the GDPR.

It wants to remain in the one-stop-shop.

It believes that this is in the interest of EU businesses.

But let’s be clear: Brexit is not, and never will be, in the interest of EU businesses. And it will especially run counter to the interests of our businesses if we abandon our decision-making autonomy. This autonomy allows us to set standards for the whole of the EU, but also to see these standards being replicated around the world. Continue reading